Research

We will train young scientists to combat cardiovascular burden in chronic kidney disease by providing them with excellent scientific, technological and complementary skills to generate innovative insights in the pathology of the cardiorenal syndrome, and translate these into innovative clinical products. Ultimately, this will improve diagnosis as well as therapy of the cardiorenal syndrome and reduce the socio-economic burden of this disease.

 

 

Our consortium will organize a multidisciplinary training programme for early-stage researchers (ESRs) to enable them translating knowledge and ideas in the field of the cardiorenal syndrome into innovative research and products. This multi-disciplinary training programme will be embedded in an already established cooperation of academic and non-academic partners. As part of their scientific training, the recruited ESRs will (Fig. 1):

  • Identify by proteomics/peptidomics analyses to reveal candidates for diagnosis, prediction and treatment of the cardiorenal syndrome.

  • Generate a using bioinformatics, to assess the value of biomarker candidates in diagnostic and predictive signatures, and reveal key candidates for biomarkers and targets.

  • Study , the role of biomarker/target candidates and novel therapeutic strategies, to reveal novel diagnostic and therapeutic options.

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit a massively increased risk for cardiovascular events: 50% of patients with CKD stage 4-5 suffer from cardiovascular disease (CVD)  , and cardiovascular mortality accounts for ~40-50% of all deaths in patients with CKD stage 4 as well as patients with end-stage renal disease, compared with 26% in controls with normal kidney function   . With 10-13% of people presenting CKD and CVD accounting for ~9% of total health care costs, the socio-economic burden of this cardiovascular-renal pathology, referred to as the cardiorenal syndrome, is extremely high.

 

Recent studies have revealed that CKD itself is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events  . This may explain in part why traditional strategies to improve cardiovascular outcome have largely failed in the context of CKD  . Also, this emphasizes the need to identify CKD-specific pathology, biomarkers and targets for CVD, in order to reduce the increased cardiovascular mortality in CKD patients through novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

1

2,3

4

5

References:

1.Stevens et al. Kidney Int 2007; 2.Thompson et al. J Am Soc Nephrol 2015; 3.Drey et al. Am J Kidney Dis 2003; 4.Ortiz et al. Lancet 2014; 5.Tonelli et al. Lancet 2012.

List of ESRs’ projects

ESR1: Plasma peptidomics to identify CRS biomarkers

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

Institute for Molecular Cardiovascular Research, University Clinic Aachen, Germany

Prof. Dr. Joachim Jankowski

 

Co-supervisors:

Biochemistry department, School for Cardiovascular Diseases in Maastricht, the Netherlands

Prof. Leon Schurgers/ Prof. Erik Biessen

 

Fresenius Medical Care, Germany

Dr. Sonja Steppan

 

 

 

 

ESR2: Plasma and tissue proteomics to identify CRS biomarkers

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

Biomedical Research Foundation Academy of Athens, Greece

Prof. Dr. Antonia Vlahou

 

 

Co-supervisors:

Institute for Molecular Cardiovascular Research, University Clinic Aachen, Germany

Prof. Dr. Joachim Jankowski

 

Biochemistry department, School for Cardiovascular Diseases in Maastricht, the Netherlands

Prof. Erik Biessen

 

Fresenius Medical Care, Germany

Dr. Sonja Steppan

 

 

 

 

ESR3: Urine peptidomics to identify CRS biomarkeers

 

Host/Supervisor: 

Mosaiques Diagnostics GmbH, Germany

Prof. Dr. Petra Zürbig

 

 

Co-supervisors:

Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics and Intelligent Systems; Section for Clinical Biometrics,

Medical University Vienna, Austria

Prof. Dr. Georg Heinze

 

 

Biomedical Research Foundation Academy of Athens, Greece

Prof. Dr. Antonia Vlahou

 

 

 

ESR4: CRS disease models to assess biomarker candidates in CRS

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics and Intelligent Systems; Section for Clinical Biometrics,

Medical University Vienna, Austria

Prof. Dr. Georg Heinze

 

Co-supervisors:

Mosaiques Diagnostics GmbH, Germany

Prof. Dr. Petra Zürbig

 

 

Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale,

(Institute of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases – I2MC), France

 Dr. Julie Klein

 

 

 

ESR5: Strategies to interfere with CRS pathology

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

University de Montpellier, France

Prof. Dr. Anne Lajoix

 

 

Co-supervisors:

Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale,

(Institute of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases – I2MC), France

Prof. Dr. Joost Schanstra

 

 

Nephrology Department, University Clinic Aachen, Germany

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Floege

 

 

ESR6: Role of identified biomarker candidates in CRS pathology

 

 

Host/Supervisor: 

Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale,

(Institute of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases – I2MC), France

Prof. Dr. Joost Schanstra

 

Co-supervisors:

University de Montpellier, France

Prof. Dr. Anne Lajoix

 

 

Nephrology Department, University Clinic Aachen, Germany

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Floege

 

 

 

ESR7: Effect of uremia on vascular remodeling and calcification

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

Biochemistry department, School for Cardiovascular Diseases in Maastricht, the Netherlands

Prof. Leon Schurgers

 

 

Co-supervisors:

Nephrology Department, University Clinic Aachen, Germany

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Floege/ Prof. Dr Joachim Jankowski

 

Renal Unit Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden

 Prof. Dr. Peter Stenvinkel

 

 

 

ESR8: Vitamin K and vascular calcification mechanisms in CRS

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

Nephrology Department, University Clinic Aachen, Germany

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Floege

 

 

Co-supervisors:

Biochemistry department, School for Cardiovascular Diseases in Maastricht, the Netherlands

Prof. Leon Schurgers

 

 

Renal Unit Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden

Prof. Dr. Peter Stenvinkel

 

 

ESR9: PTM of calcification regulators in CRS

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

Biochemistry department, School for Cardiovascular Diseases in Maastricht, the Netherlands

Prof. Erik Biessen

 

Institute for Molecular Cardiovascular Research, University Clinic Aachen, Germany

Prof. Dr. Joachim Jankowski

 

Renal Unit Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden

Prof. Dr. Peter Stenvinkel

 

 

 

ESR10: Premature vascular aging in CRS patients

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

Renal Unit Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden

Prof. Dr. Peter Stenvinkel

 

Co-supervisors:

Department of Nephrology, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium

Prof. Dr. Pieter Evenepoel

 

 

University de Montpellier, France

Prof. Dr. Anne Lajoix

 

 

 

ESR11: Effect of uremia on cardiac pathology

 

 

Host/Supervisor:

Institute for Molecular Cardiovascular Research, University Clinic Aachen, Germany 

Dr. Heidi Noels

 

Co-supervisors:

Biochemistry department, School for Cardiovascular Diseases in Maastricht, the Netherlands

Prof. Leon Schurgers/ Prof. Erik Biessen

 

Fresenius Medical Care, Germany

Dr. Sonja Steppan

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© 2018 CaReSyAn

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This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 764474.

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